WWF

Adopt an Animal this
Christmas with WWF

and help protect Wildlife from £3.00/pm

Choose from 13 animals to adopt, and show a loved one you care.

WWF Adopt an Animal WWF Adopt an Animal

Adopt an Animal
with WWF

Choose from 13 animals to adopt and receive a gift pack including a cuddly toy, factbook, stickers, certificate and more!

WWF Adopt an Animal Gift Pack

from £3.00/pm

WWF Adopt an Animal Cuddly Toy

Adopt and receive a cuddly toy of your animal

WWF Adopt an Animal Gift Pack

Get a fun filled WWF adoption gift pack

Regular Updates

Plus updates on your animal three times a year

Choose your animal

Humanity has wiped out 60% of animal populations since 1970.
Your adoption gift will help to protect animals and their habitat.

Adopt a Snow Leopard

Snow leopards are on the endangered list with as little as 4,000 left in the wild.

Adopt a Polar Bear

By 2050, their numbers may decline by 30% due to the rapid loss of sea ice.

Adopt a Penguin

It is predicted there will be a 30% decline in penguin numbers by 2070.

Adopt an Elephant

We have lost 90% of African elephants in the past century.

Adopt a Tiger

There are less than 3,900 tigers left in the Wild.

Adopt a Lion

It is estimated that 75% of lion populations are in decline.

Adopt a Leopard

Amur leopards are critically endangered with only around 90 left in the wild.

Adopt a Dolphin

300,000 cetaceans die as bycatch of fishing every year.

Adopt a Panda

It is estimated that only 1,860 giant pandas remain in the wild today.

Adopt a Jaguar

Jaguars now occupy less than half of their historic habitat.

Adopt a Rhino

Rhino poaching has increased by 9,300% in South Africa in the past 8 years.

Adopt a Mountain Gorilla

This primate is critically endangered with only around 1,000 left in the wild.

Adopt a Turtle

There has been an 80% decline in marine turtles over 3 generations.


60% of the earth's wildlife populations have been lost since 1970 according to the WWF's 2018 Living Planet report.

This includes more than 4,000 species of mammal, bird, fish, reptile and amphibian. Key causes of these terrible statistics are manmade factors including climate change, deforestation and pollution.

WWF is a global conservation organisation dedicated to reversing these trends by protecting the natural environment and the animals that depend on it. When you adopt an animal with WWF you are helping to fund their vital conservation work by making a regular payment from just £3.00 a month – that’s pretty much the cost of a cup of coffee.

With your adoption you help to:

The populations of many species have fallen dramatically since the turn of the 20th century. Some, like the tiger, have been hunted to near extinction. Others, like the orangutan, have simply lost their homes as forests have been cleared to make way for agriculture or development. Adopting an animal will provide WWF with the money it needs to help keep these species around in the wild for future generations to enjoy.

Some of the most important work WWF does is the preservation and restoration of natural habitats. We have lost many species because humans increasingly encroach on their habitat. This is not something that is an inevitable consequence of growing populations. With a little planning and education, this needless destruction can be avoided. By adopting an animal you will be contributing to the protection of wild habitats of many endangered species.

Perhaps the single greatest threat to many critically endangered species like the rhino or the elephant is illegal poaching. Adopting an animal will provide WWF with the money it needs to help fund anti-poaching patrols and purchase equipment such as drone technology that can be used to keep animals protected.

In some parts of the world people like to keep wild animals as pets and in some cultures animal body parts are considered to have medicinal value. This means that some animals are captured and sold on the black market whilst others are simply killed for their body parts even though there is no scientific evidence suggesting they have any medicinal value. By adopting an animal you will be helping to fund WWF’s efforts in stopping the wildlife trade, lobbying governments to enforce bans and educate the public. Hopefully all of that will reduce the demand and lead to less needless killing of animals.

WWF Adopt an Animal WWF Adopt an Animal
Standard Delivery

Standard Delivery

Your gift pack will be delivered within the UK FREE of charge. Your package will be sent out within 3 business days, but please allow up to 10 days for delivery.

Express Delivery

Express Delivery

Express Delivery costs £3.79 if you order before 2pm Monday - Thursday. Your gift pack will then be delivered within 2 - 3 working days.

WWF Adopt an Animal Certificate

Last Minute Gift?

WWF offer a gift certificate to print or email so you have something to give on the big day. Your gift pack will then be received within 10 days of purchase.

WWF Adopt an Animal Gift Pack

WWF Adoption Gift Pack

WWF

Adopt an animal and the recipient gets a beautiful gift pack to let them know just how much you care about them.

Gift Pack Includes:

  • An optional cuddly toy of your animal.
  • A factbook about your adopted species.
  • Fun bookmarks and stickers.
  • A certificate to frame your commitment to the WWF (printed on recycled paper).
  • Two exclusive magazines delivered three times a year:
    WWF's "Wild World" and a magazine dedicated to news and updates for your adopted animal.
WWF

About WWF

Registered Charity Number: 1081247

WWF is a global conservation organisation dedicated to protecting the natural environment and the animals that depend on it. The organisation was first established in 1961 in the UK, but now operates in more than 100 countries and has over 5 million members around the world.

WWF seeks to stop habitat destruction, prevent human animal conflict, end the illegal trade in wildlife and their body parts as part of its efforts to protect wildlife. The organisation tries to restore habitats, promote sustainable development for local communities who depend on natural resources and lobbies governments on behalf of wildlife protection.

WWF Conservation
Image Description

Adopt an Animal with WWF

Adopt an animal with WWF from just £3.00 a month and help protect endangered animals around the world.


Animal News

Our team bring your the latest conservation news from around the globe.

Deforestation In Brazil’s Amazon Reaches A Decade Long High

Things aren’t looking great in Brazil with the election of a president who seems to care very little about the environment and new data which shows that the amount of deforestation that has taken place this year is at a decade long high. 7,900 square kilometres of rainforest was cleared between August 2018 and July 2018 according to Brazil’s environment ministry which used satellite imaging to monitor the level of deforestation.

Help WWF Protect Our Polar Bears And Halt Global Warming

Most people know that polar bears have evolved to survive in the cold Arctic wilderness. However, their survival is at risk because climate change is causing the sea ice they depend on to disappear. Things have gotten so bad, that the polar bear now faces the prospect of an uncertain future as shrinking sea ice means increasing challenges. The rapidly warming Arctic should serve as a warning that not only are polar bears at risk but out world is seriously under threat.

Discovery Of New Snow Leopard Habitat In India Means That Population Is Increasing

Conservationists believe the snow leopard population in India is increasing after discovering their presence along the Sutlej River in the Indian state of Himachal Pradesh. Snow leopards are amongst the most elusive species on the planet so it was not easy to discover their new habitat. Footage of the snow leopards were captured from camera traps placed in remote areas of the Lippa Asrang Wildlife sanctuary.

WWF Report Suggests Humans Have Wiped Out 60 Per Cent Of All Wildlife

A major report produced by WWF suggests that 60 per cent of all species of wildlife, including mammals, birds, fish and reptiles have been wiped out by humans. Rather unsurprisingly leading conservationists are warning that this human induced mass extinction is an emergency that threatens our own species itself. The WWF report was produced in collaboration with 59 scientists from all over the world and found the cause of the massacre is the direct consequence of huge and increasing food and natural resource consumption.