News

We bring you the latest from around the World in wildlife and conservation news.

WWF Launch New ‘My Footprint’ App

WWF have launched their ‘My Footprint’ App targeting the way we live and the food we eat in an effort to reduce global destruction.It is becoming increasingly clear that humans need to change the way we do things as we’re pushing climate change to the brink.

Male Elephants – Leaders Not Loners?

Recent study has found that male African elephants have more of a social role in ‘elephant society’ than previously thought.

Wildlife in ‘Catastrophic Decline’

Wildlife populations have fallen by more than 2 thirds in less than 50 years according to major report by WWF. This alarming decline shows no sign of slowing.Tanya Steele, chief executive at WWF, declared that human activity such as burning forests, over fishing seas, and destroying wild areas is pushing wildlife populations to the brink.

World Orangutan Day – 10 Amazing Orangutan Facts

World Orangutan Day was celebrated on the 19th August. To mark the occasion we have put together 10 great orangutan facts.

International Tiger Day – 29th July

International Tiger Day was created so that people around the world can raise awareness for tiger conservation. Threats such as poaching, conflict with humans and habitat loss are driving tigers to near extinction.

Mountain Gorilla Killed

A well known silverback mountain gorilla called Rafiki has been killed in Uganda’s Bwindi Forest Park. Up until recently mountain gorilla’s were classed as critically endangered. Following a significant conservation effort, their numbers are on the rise, however Rafiki’s killing could set that effort back.

Snow Leopard Tourism

Snow leopards are elusive. They live high up in the mountains of central Asia. They inhabit rugged, inaccessible terrain. Estimating their numbers is difficult but the Snow Leopard Trust believes there are between 3500 to 7000 snow leopards in the wild. The cold mountainous climate and harsh surroundings make sightings rare. Tourism to view these beautiful creatures would seem unlikely but that is what is emerging in an effort to help protect them.

Increase in Illegal Jaguar Trade

Jaguars in the wild are classified as near threatened. There are estimated to be 173,000 left in Central and South America, and that number is falling. Their decline is largely due to three reasons. In part it is due to ranchers shooting them for attacking their cattle. A greater threat is deforestation, with about 50% of their historical natural habitat having been destroyed. The third reason is the illegal trade in jaguar body parts for eventual use in products.